Investigating original antigenic sin responses to H5N1 influenza viruses

Masseoud, Feda and Skountzou, Ioanna and Temperton, Nigel J. and Jacob, Joshy (2010) Investigating original antigenic sin responses to H5N1 influenza viruses. In: Journal of Immunology Meeting Abstract Supplement. Immunity to Influenza. (doi:92. 19) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

H5N1 influenza A virus remains a global threat since its outbreak in 1997. Its re-emergence in 2003 spread from Asia to Europe, the Middle-East and Africa, raising concerns of a possible pandemic. While stockpiling of H5N1 prepandemic vaccines has been initiated, strain prediction is difficult due to the emergence of distinct clades/subclades. Antigenic variation between vaccine and pandemic strains may confer cross-protection or result in antigenic sin, in which the immune response is directed against the original strain rather than the novel protective antigenic determinants. Observed between strains that have undergone antigenic drift, this misdirected response may compromise protective immunity. This study was carried out to determine the extent to which antigenic sin interferes with immune responses to the potentially pandemic influenza H5 subtype. We immunized mice with a DNA vaccine encoding the full length HA from influenza A/Vietnam/1194 followed by a vaccine encoding HA of drifted H5N1 strains, ranging in genetic identity from 100%- 88%. We are currently assessing responses directed against either the primary or the drifted strain by microneutralization using a pseudotyped lentivirus bearing HA from the respective H5N1 strains. By examining antigenic sin due to H5N1 viruses, we can better understand the behavior of the virus as it circulates in the human population, and therefore improve preparedness in the context of H5N1 vaccine development and pandemic planning.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Poster)
Subjects: Q Science > QR Microbiology > QR355 Virology
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > Medway School of Pharmacy
Depositing User: Nigel Temperton
Date Deposited: 04 May 2014 21:58 UTC
Last Modified: 12 Aug 2014 10:19 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/40959 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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