The Great Bovine Pestilence and its Economic and Environmental Consequences in England and Wales, 1318-50

Slavin, Philip (2012) The Great Bovine Pestilence and its Economic and Environmental Consequences in England and Wales, 1318-50. Economic History Review, 65 (4). pp. 1239-1266. ISSN 0013-0117. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0289.2011.00625.x) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0289.2011.00625.x

Abstract

The present article seeks to identify the nature, extent, and impact of the Great Bovine Pestilence in England and Wales, between 1318 and 1350. The murrain, which killed around 62 per cent of the bovine animals in England and Wales in 1319–20, had a tremendous impact within both the seigniorial and peasant sectors of late medieval agriculture. In particular, the pestilence, which decreased the overall population of dairy cattle, depressed the overall levels of milk supply available for human consumption. Is it possible that the bovine crisis of 1319–20, and the subsequent protein shortage, were instrumental in weakening the immune system of humans and making them prone to the pestilence some 30 years later?

Item Type: Article
Additional information: questionable eprint id: 32010;
Subjects: C Auxiliary Sciences of History
D History General and Old World
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of History
Depositing User: Stewart Brownrigg
Date Deposited: 07 Mar 2014 00:05 UTC
Last Modified: 10 Feb 2016 14:39 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/40739 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Slavin, Philip: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6460-145X
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