Textual Intimacies: Letters, Journals, Poetry – Ghost Writing Telegraph Cottage

Smith, Simon M and Allen, Felicity (2013) Textual Intimacies: Letters, Journals, Poetry – Ghost Writing Telegraph Cottage. In: Cooke, Jennifer, ed. Scenes of Intimacy: Reading, Writing and Theorizing Contemporary Literature. Bloomsbury Academic, New York and London, pp. 73-94. ISBN 978-1-4411-0726-8. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Item Type: Book section
Additional information: Book edited by Jennifer Cooke. ‘Textual Intimacies’ is a co-authored piece (Felicity Allen and Simon Smith) conjoining journal entries and a series of poems contextualized by a piece of theoretical prose in which the method and procedure of the creative text, Telegraph Cottage, are explored in relation to Barthes, Heidegger and Blanchot through their notions of ‘the journal,’ ‘nearness,’ and the idea of the ‘portrait’. The text of Telegraph Cottage draws on the journal of visual artist Felicity Allen and sonnet cut ups by Simon Smith based on the love letters of Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett. The ‘matter’ of the work is the intimate connections between prose and poetry, between ‘personal’ texts such as journals and letters, and the objectification of process writing revealed in ‘found’ or ‘cut up’ material, and how the personal and the ‘objectified’ texts meet and reflect upon one another. To counterpoint the personal register of the journal, the poems are inquiries into the linguistic implications of alienation for the speaking subject and into how the form of the poem can empty out personal utterance of its immediate context. The theoretical research has taken the form of extensive reading in philosophical and linguistic approaches to fractured subjectivity; the writings of Barthes, Blanchot and Heidegger, as already noted, are evident influences.; number of additional authors: 1;
Subjects: P Language and Literature
P Language and Literature > PE English
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of English
Depositing User: Simon Smith
Date Deposited: 07 Mar 2014 00:05 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 12:28 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/40677 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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