Consuming Indians: Tsonnonthouan, Colonialism, and the Commodification of Culture

Richardson, Robbie J (2010) Consuming Indians: Tsonnonthouan, Colonialism, and the Commodification of Culture. Eighteenth-Century Fiction, 22 (4). pp. 693-715. ISSN 0840-6286. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1353/ecf.0.0160) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/ecf.0.0160

Abstract

During and following the Seven Years War, North American Indigenous people began to occupy a unique position in the British imaginary as compelling yet contradictory subjects, existing outside the culture of consumerism that was rapidly rising in Britain. The satirical novel Memoirs of the Life and Adventures of Tsonnonthouan (1763) mimicked both the ethnographic works that British people read in increasing numbers and the body of Grub Street texts imitating Tristram Shandy. The novel, which depicts "Indians" as consumers and worshippers of European commodities, negotiates the entanglement of culture and consumerism in both Britain and the colonies.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PE English
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of English
Depositing User: Stewart Brownrigg
Date Deposited: 07 Mar 2014 00:05 UTC
Last Modified: 13 Apr 2016 09:52 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/40626 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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