Skip to main content

Making Sense of the Manufacturing Belt: Determinants of US Industrial Location, 1880-1920

Klein, Alexander, Crafts, Nicholas (2012) Making Sense of the Manufacturing Belt: Determinants of US Industrial Location, 1880-1920. Journal of Economic Geography, 12 (4). pp. 775-807. ISSN 1468-2710. (doi:10.1093/jeg/lbr023) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:40512)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jeg/lbr023

Abstract

This article investigates industrial location in the USA around the turn of the 20th century using a model which subsumes both market-potential and factor-endowment arguments. The results show that market potential was central to the existence of the manufacturing belt, that it mattered more than factor endowments, and that its impact came through interactions both with scale economies and with linkage effects. Market potential was generally much higher for states in the manufacturing belt. Natural advantage played a role in industrial location decisions in the late 19th century but its importance then faded away.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1093/jeg/lbr023
Additional information: number of additional authors: 1;
Uncontrolled keywords: Factor endowments, linkage effects, manufacturing belt, market potential, new economic geography,
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HB Economic Theory
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Economics
Depositing User: Stewart Brownrigg
Date Deposited: 07 Mar 2014 00:05 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2020 04:09 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/40512 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Klein, Alexander: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9026-3389
  • Depositors only (login required):