Bioactive glass sol-gel foam scaffolds: Evolution of nanoporosity during processing andin situmonitoring of apatite layer formation using small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering

Fitzgerald, Victoria and Martin, Richard A. and Jones, Julian R. and Qiu, Dong and Wetherall, Karen and Moss, Rob M. and Newport, Robert J. (2009) Bioactive glass sol-gel foam scaffolds: Evolution of nanoporosity during processing andin situmonitoring of apatite layer formation using small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 91A (1). pp. 76-83. ISSN 1552-4965. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.32206) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.32206

Abstract

Recent work has highlighted the potential of sol-gel–derived calcium silicate glasses for the regeneration or replacement of damaged bone tissue. The work presented herein provides new insight into the processing of bioactive calcia-silica sol-gel foams, and the reaction mechanisms associated with them when immersed in vitro in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Small-angle X-ray scattering and wide-angle X-ray scattering (diffraction) have been used to study the stabilization of these foams via heat treatment, with analogous in situ time-resolved data being gathered for a foam immersed in SBF. During thermal processing, pore sizes have been identified in the range of 16.5–62.0 nm and are only present once foams have been heated to 400°C and above. Calcium nitrate crystallites were present until foams were heated to 600°C; the crystallite size varied from 75 to 145 nm and increased in size with heat treatment up to 300°C, then decreased in size down to 95nm at 400°C. The in situ time-resolved data show that the average pore diameter decreases as a function of immersion time in SBF, as calcium phosphates grow on the glass surfaces. Over the same time, Bragg peaks indicative of tricalcium phosphate were evident after only 1-h immersion time, and later, hydroxycarbonate apatite was also seen. The hydroxycarbonate apatite appears to have preferred orientation in the (h,k,0) direction. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2009

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: small angle X-ray diffraction; wide angle X-ray diffraction; bioactive foam scaffolds; thermal stabilization; simulated body fluid
Subjects: Q Science > QC Physics
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Physical Sciences
Depositing User: Stewart Brownrigg
Date Deposited: 07 Mar 2014 00:05 UTC
Last Modified: 13 Apr 2016 09:17 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/40455 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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