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Locomotor muscle fatigue increases cardiorespiratory responses and reduces performance during intense cycling exercise independently from metabolic stress

Marcora, Samuele Maria, Bosio, Andrea, de Morree, Helma M. (2008) Locomotor muscle fatigue increases cardiorespiratory responses and reduces performance during intense cycling exercise independently from metabolic stress. American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 294 (3). R874-R883. ISSN 1522-1490. (doi:10.1152/ajpregu.00678.2007) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajpregu.00678.2007

Abstract

Locomotor muscle fatigue, defined as an exercise-induced reduction in maximal voluntary force, occurs during prolonged exercise, but its effects on cardiorespiratory responses and exercise performance are unknown. In this investigation, a significant reduction in locomotor muscle force (?18%, P < 0.05) was isolated from the metabolic stress usually associated with fatiguing exercise using a 100-drop-jumps protocol consisting of one jump every 20 s from a 40-cm-high platform. The effect of this treatment on time to exhaustion during high-intensity constant-power cycling was measured in study 1 (n = 10). In study 2 (n = 14), test duration (871 ± 280 s) was matched between fatigue and control condition (rest). In study 1, locomotor muscle fatigue caused a significant curtailment in time to exhaustion (636 ± 278 s) compared with control (750 ± 281 s) (P = 0.003) and increased cardiac output. Breathing frequency was significantly higher in the fatigue condition in both studies despite similar oxygen consumption and blood lactate accumulation. In study 2, high-intensity cycling did not induce further fatigue to eccentrically-fatigued locomotor muscles. In both studies, there was a significant increase in heart rate in the fatigue condition, and perceived exertion was significantly increased in study 2 compared with control. These results suggest that locomotor muscle fatigue has a significant influence on cardiorespiratory responses and exercise performance during high-intensity cycling independently from metabolic stress. These effects seem to be mediated by the increased central motor command and perception of effort required to exercise with weaker locomotor muscles.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1152/ajpregu.00678.2007
Additional information: This output is one of the most cited articles on fatigue published in Sport Sciences and Physiology journals during the REF period (7th place out 768 articles). In terms of citations, this output is also in the upper 5% of all 445 articles published in AJP-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology during the same period (2008) (source Web of Science, accessed 21/09/13).; number of additional authors: 2;
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology (Living systems)
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: Stewart Brownrigg
Date Deposited: 07 Mar 2014 00:05 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 12:23 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/40363 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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