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Effects of high-intensity resistance training in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A randomized controlled trial.

Lemmey, Andrew B., Marcora, Samuele Maria, Chester, Kathryn, Wilson, Sally, Casanova, Francesco, Maddison, Peter J. (2009) Effects of high-intensity resistance training in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A randomized controlled trial. Arthritis Care & Research, 61 (12). pp. 1726-1734. ISSN 1529-0131. (doi:10.1002/art.24891) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:40361)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.24891

Abstract

Objective

To confirm, in a randomized controlled trial (RCT), the efficacy of high-intensity progressive resistance training (PRT) in restoring muscle mass and function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Additionally, to investigate the role of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system in exercise-induced muscle hypertrophy in the context of RA.

Results

Analyses of variance revealed that PRT increased LBM and ALM (P < 0.01); reduced trunk fat mass by 2.5 kg (not significant); and improved training-specific strength by 119%, chair stands by 30%, knee extensor strength by 25%, arm curls by 23%, and walk time by 17% (for objective function tests, P values ranged from 0.027 to 0.001 versus controls). In contrast, body composition and physical function remained unchanged in control patients. Changes in LBM and regional lean mass were associated with changes in objective function (P values ranged from 0.126 to <0.0001). Coinciding with muscle hypertrophy, previously diminished muscle levels of IGF-1 and IGF binding protein 3 both increased following PRT (P < 0.05).

In an RCT, 24 weeks of PRT proved safe and effective in restoring lean mass and function in patients with RA. Muscle hypertrophy coincided with significant elevations of attenuated muscle IGF levels, revealing a possible contributory mechanism for rheumatoid cachexia. PRT should feature in disease management.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1002/art.24891
Additional information: This output was one of only 10 randomized controlled trials included in a recent meta-analysis of resistance exercise in rheumatoid arthritis (Baillet et al. Rheumatology. 2012; 51(3): 519-27). The research presented in this output was funded by a project grant from the Arthritis Research Campaign (now Arthritis Research UK).; number of additional authors: 5;
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports medicine
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: Stewart Brownrigg
Date Deposited: 07 Mar 2014 00:05 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 12:52 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/40361 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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