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Circuit Elements With Memory: Memristors, Memcapacitors, and Meminductors

Di Ventra, Massimiliano, Pershin, Yuriy V., Chua, Leon O. (2009) Circuit Elements With Memory: Memristors, Memcapacitors, and Meminductors. Proceedings of the IEEE, 97 (10). pp. 1717-1724. ISSN 0018-9219. (doi:10.1109/JPROC.2009.2021077) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/JPROC.2009.2021077

Abstract

We extend the notion of memristive systems to capacitive and inductive elements, namely, capacitors and inductors whose properties depend on the state and history of the system. All these elements typically show pinched hysteretic loops in the two constitutive variables that define them: current-voltage for the memristor, charge-voltage for the memcapacitor, and current-flux for the meminductor. We argue that these devices are common at the nanoscale, where the dynamical properties of electrons and ions are likely to depend on the history of the system, at least within certain time scales. These elements and their combination in circuits open up new functionalities in electronics and are likely to find applications in neuromorphic devices to simulate learning, adaptive, and spontaneous behavior.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1109/JPROC.2009.2021077
Additional information: <01> The memristor has attracted phenomenal worldwide attention since Chua formulated his theory in 1971 and HP made the first memristor in 2008. This paper extends the notion of memristive systems to capacitive and inductive elements, namely capacitors and inductors whose properties depend on the state and history of the system. The wealth of citations shows that the proposed elements open up new functionalities in electronics and they are finding rich applications in unconventional computers and neuromorphic devices to simulate learning, adaptive and spontaneous behaviour.; number of additional authors: 2;
Uncontrolled keywords: Capacitance dynamic response hysteresis inductance memory resistance
Subjects: Q Science
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Computing
Depositing User: Stewart Brownrigg
Date Deposited: 07 Mar 2014 00:05 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 12:20 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/40166 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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