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Assessment of the Consequences of Anthropogenic Pressures on Alouatta palliata and Ateles geoffroyi Physiology in Northern Costa Rica

Vanlangendonck, Nicolas, Guttierrez-Espeleta, Gustavo A., Humle, Tatyana (2013) Assessment of the Consequences of Anthropogenic Pressures on Alouatta palliata and Ateles geoffroyi Physiology in Northern Costa Rica. In: Folia Primatologica. 84 (3-5). p. 340. Karger (doi:10.1159/000354129) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000354129

Abstract

Previous studies have shown a positive relationship between proximity to humans or habitat fragmentation and parasitic levels in non-human primates (NHPs). However, to date few have explicitly explored links between parasite load and stress conditions. To better understand the links between parasite prevalence and NHP immune system efficiency and stress levels, faecal samples of Alouatta palliata and the critically endangered Ateles geoffroyi geoffroyi were non-invasively collected in northern Costa Rica. We investigated whether the presence of gastrointestinal parasites was related to the abundance of hormones (cortisol and testosterone). Samples were gathered across three areas differing in the frequency and diversity of human presence, i.e. around the Caño Palma Biological Station, near villages and at ecotourism sites. Two grams of each faecal sample were stored in a sugar saturated solution with 10% formalin to conserve the parasites; the remaining matter was dried to preserve DNA and steroid hormones. The samples enabled the quantification of parasites as well as testosterone and cortisol levels using ELISA as proxies of general health status and stress levels. Data on parasite abundance and hormone levels were contrasted across the two species and the three different sampling areas. Furthermore, we assessed the genetic exchange among the different groups of primates sampled. We genetically analysed the samples using 12 microsatellites previously validated by the University of Costa Rica. We verified whether transmission of parasites among the groups could be possible concomitant to the genetic exchange. This study aimed to better understand and assess the impact of human factors on NHP health and across NHPs with different socio-ecological characteristics.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Poster)
DOI/Identification number: 10.1159/000354129
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH541 Ecology
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH75 Conservation (Biology)
Q Science > QP Physiology (Living systems)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > Biodiversity Conservation Group
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: Tatyana Humle
Date Deposited: 20 Oct 2014 08:40 UTC
Last Modified: 22 Jan 2020 04:06 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/39041 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Humle, Tatyana: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1919-631X
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