Modernising Drug Law Enforcement: Applying harm reduction principles to the policing of retail drug markets

Stevens, Alex (2013) Modernising Drug Law Enforcement: Applying harm reduction principles to the policing of retail drug markets. Project report. International Drug Policy Consortium (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/64663568/librar...

Abstract

Key Points: • The level of harm is more important than the size of the market. • Visible, open air drug markets tend to be more harmful per unit of use than hidden, closed drug markets • Policing tactics that are not experienced by the community as being fair, lawful and effective will harm police legitimacy and community relations. • Some enforcement-led approaches, including short-term crackdowns and large scale stop and search, are unlikely to produce sustainable reductions in drug sales. They may increase levels of violence and health harms and reduce police legitimacy. • It is rarely possible to eliminate retail drug markets, but well designed and implemented policing tactics can force the drug market to take less harmful forms. • Applying harm reduction principles to drug policing may boost police legitimacy as well as community safety. • Focused deterrence and ‘pulling levers’ may reduce both harm and crime, but this depends on the context and on careful implementation and evaluation.

Item Type: Monograph (Project report)
Additional information: Report 3
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Medway
Depositing User: Mita Mondal
Date Deposited: 24 Mar 2014 15:58 UTC
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2019 09:33 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/38894 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Stevens, Alex: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4878-3871
  • Depositors only (login required):