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Between Normalisation and Exception: The Securitisation of Islam and the Construction of the Secular Subject

Mavelli, Luca (2013) Between Normalisation and Exception: The Securitisation of Islam and the Construction of the Secular Subject. Millennium: Journal of International Studies, 41 (2). pp. 159-181. ISSN 0305-8298. (doi:10.1177/0305829812463655) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0305829812463655

Abstract

In recent political and scholarly debates, the notion of ‘securitisation of Islam’ has acquired increasing relevance, yet very little attempt has been made to investigate the theoretical implications of the securitisation of Muslim subjects carried out by secular regimes for thinking security. This article aims to partially fill this gap by exploring the securitisation of Muslim minorities in Western societies as a process of construction and reproduction of secular modes of subjectivity. To this end, the article outlines the contours of an approach to securitisation which draws on both the Copenhagen and the Paris schools of security studies, as well as on a gender/body perspective which focuses on the subjectivities that securitisation aims to produce. Following some illustrations of the securitisation of Islam in the aftermath of 9/11 and 7/7, an exploration of a Western notion of subjectivity revolving around the securitisation of Christianity and the construction of Islam as a threatening deviation from this historical trajectory, and an analysis of the securitisation of the headscarf and the burqa in France, the article concludes that securitisation rests on both logics of political normalisation and exception which warrant an exploration of the discursive sediments which make them possible

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1177/0305829812463655
Subjects: J Political Science
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations
Depositing User: Luca Mavelli
Date Deposited: 03 Mar 2014 17:56 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 11:55 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/38533 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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