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Emotions, embodiment and the sensation of society

Shilling, Chris (1997) Emotions, embodiment and the sensation of society. Sociological Review, 45 (2). pp. 195-219. ISSN 0038-0261. (doi:10.1111/1467-954X.00061) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-954X.00061

Abstract

The study of emotions has attracted an increased amount of attention from mainstream sociologists in recent years, both because of its potential to provide an added dimension to the analysis of such subjects as social conflict, gender inequalities and the organisation of the workplace, and as a result of its relevance to theoretical and methodological debates which have long characterised the discipline. This paper suggests that some of the core questions facing this subject can be interrogated productively by engaging critically with the work of one of the most important 'founding figures' of the discipline, Emile Durkheim. What Collins (1988) refers to as the 'underground wing' of Durkheim's work has yet to be fully utilised or developed by sociologists concerned with emotions, yet it provides us with a suggestive and provocative means of reconceptualising the gulf that often exists within contemporary work on emotions as malleable and controllable, on the one hand, and that concerned with emotions as intransigent 'somatic states of being', on the other. As such, Durkheim's writings constitute an important resource for sociologists concerned with the ongoing project of 'embodying' the discipline.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/1467-954X.00061
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Sociology
Depositing User: Mita Mondal
Date Deposited: 27 Feb 2014 12:07 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 11:55 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/38508 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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