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Do institutions matter? Explaining the use of working time flexibility arrangements of companies across 21 European countries using a multilevel model focusing on country level determinants

Chung, Heejung (2008) Do institutions matter? Explaining the use of working time flexibility arrangements of companies across 21 European countries using a multilevel model focusing on country level determinants. Discussion paper. WZB: Berlin (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://bibliothek.wz-berlin.de/pdf/2008/i08-107.pd...

Abstract

This paper explores the reasons behind the differences in the use and provision of different

special focus on the country differences. Competing theories on the cross-country variances of

forces of working time flexibility practices in comparison to other factors such as economic,

of companies in the context of the country in which it is embedded, while including

issue of flexibility is addressed broadly, thus, it perceives labour market flexibility as a

“flexible firm” approach is taken and various flexibility options are considered to be bundles

the paper explains the differences between countries where there are more worker-oriented

The data used here is the European Establishment Survey of Working-Time and

Working Conditions. This survey covers over 21,000 establishments in 21 EU member states

employment protection regulations or centralization of bargaining explain the differences

is associated to countries where companies use more worker friendly working time options

such as deindustrialization or female labour market participation patterns also explain the

seems that institutions are more important whereas for the company-oriented flexibility options,

economic and labour market situations are the driving source.

Item Type: Monograph (Discussion paper)
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Depositing User: Mita Mondal
Date Deposited: 25 Feb 2014 09:34 UTC
Last Modified: 31 Jan 2020 04:05 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/38463 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Chung, Heejung: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6422-6119
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