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Christian ideology and the image of a holy land: the place of Jerusalem pilgrimage in the various Christianities

Bowman, Glenn W. (2013) Christian ideology and the image of a holy land: the place of Jerusalem pilgrimage in the various Christianities. In: Contesting the Sacred: The Anthropology of Christian Pilgrimage. Wipf and Stock, Eugene, Oregon, pp. 98-121. ISBN 978-1-62564-085-7.

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Abstract

The great majority of the world's holy cities and sacred shrines attract pilgrims from culturally circumscribed catchment areas, and thus host pilgrims united by strong degrees of cultural homogeneity. Jerusalem, on the other hand, draws pilgrims from a vast multitude of nations and cultural traditions. During religious festivals - which tend to be imbricated because of the antagonistic engagement of Judaism, Christianity and Islam - Jerusalem's streets swarm with men and women displaying a rainbow of secular and religious costumes, speaking a cacophony of languages, and pursuing a plethora of divine figures. Other sacred centres which attract pilgrims from areas as heterogeneous as those which provide Jerusalem's pilgrims - eminent among these Mecca (which nonetheless services only the sects of a single religion) - funnel their devotees through ritual routines which mask differences beneath identical repertoires of movement and utterance2. Jerusalem's pilgrims, on the other hand, go to different places at different times where they engage in very different forms of worship. The result is a continuous crossing and diverging - often marked by clashes - of bodies, voices and religious artifacts. Jerusalem does not, in fact, appear so much as a holy city as as a multitude of holy cities - as many as are the religious communities which worship at the site - built over the same spot, operating at the same moment, and contending for hegemony.

Item Type: Book section
Additional information: Third printing of a volume originally published by Routledge in 1991
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BL Religion
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BR Christianity
D History General and Old World > DE The Mediterranean Region. The Greco-Roman World
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > Social and Cultural Anthropology
Depositing User: G. Bowman
Date Deposited: 16 Feb 2014 11:13 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 11:52 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/38309 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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