Invention and modification of a new tool use behavior: Ant-fishing in trees by a wild chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus) at Bossou, Guinea

Yamamoto, Shinya and Yamakoshi, Gen and Humle, Tatyana and Matsuzawa, Tetsuro (2008) Invention and modification of a new tool use behavior: Ant-fishing in trees by a wild chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus) at Bossou, Guinea. American Journal of Primatology, 70 (7). pp. 699-702. ISSN 0275-2565. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1002/ajp.20544) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

Wild chimpanzees are known to have a different repertoire of tool use unique to each community. For example, "ant-dipping" is a tool use behavior known in several chimpanzee communities across Africa targeted at driver ants (Dorylus spp.) on the ground, whereas "ant-fishing," which is aimed at carpenter ants (Camponotus spp.) in trees, has primarily been observed among the chimpanzees of Mahale in Tanzania. Although the evidence for differences between field sites is accumulating, we have little knowledge on how these tool use behaviors appear at each site and on how these are modified over time. This study reports two"ant-fishing" sessions which occurred 2 years apart by a young male chimpanzee at Bossou, Guinea. Ant-fishing had never been observed before in this community over the past 27 years. During the first session, at the age of 5, he employed wands of similar length when ant-fishing in trees to those used for ant-dipping on the ground, which is a customary tool use behavior of this community. Two years later, at the age of 7, his tools for ant-fishing were shorter and more suitable for capturing carpenter ants. This observation is a rare example of innovation in the wild and does provide insights into problem-solving and learning processes in chimpanzees.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Ant-fishing, Bossou, Chimpanzee, Innovation, Tool modification, Tool use, ant, hominid, tool use, wild population, animal, ant, article, feeding behavior, male, Pan troglodytes, tool use, Animals, Ants, Feeding Behavior, Male, Pan troglodytes, Tool Use Behavior, Camponotus, Formicidae, Pan, Pan troglodytes, Pan troglodytes verus
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH541 Ecology
Q Science > QL Zoology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > Biological Anthropology
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: Tatyana Humle
Date Deposited: 04 Apr 2014 14:30 UTC
Last Modified: 26 Apr 2018 10:03 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/38035 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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