Part of the British mainstream? British Muslim students and Islamic Student Associations

Song, Miri (2012) Part of the British mainstream? British Muslim students and Islamic Student Associations. Journal of Youth Studies, 15 (2). pp. 143-160. ISSN 1367-6261. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/13676261.2011.630995) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13676261.2011.630995

Abstract

In recent years, fear of 'the other' has focused particularly on 'home grown' second-generation Muslims. In the aftermath of the 7 July 2005 bombings in London, there was particular horror and incredulity expressed about the fact that many of the bombers had been born and raised in Britain, and universities have been increasingly regarded by various analysts and politicians as potential 'hotbeds of extremism.' Yet apart from sensationalistic images of British Muslims as threatening radicals, we still have relatively little in-depth information about the vast majority of ordinary British Muslim young people in higher education. This article explores young British Muslim students' views and experiences of Islamic Student Associations (ISOCs) at three universities in the southeast. What motivates Muslim students to join ISOCs and can we determine clear differences between those who join ISOCs and those who do not? While there is growing evidence that younger British Muslims are more politicized than their parents, and are more likely to mobilize around their identity as Muslims, most British Muslim students' involvement in ISOCs does not pose a threat to British society or to their ability to negotiate their British and Muslim sense of selves.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: British, extremism, identity, Islamic Student Associations, Muslims, second generation, students, university
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Depositing User: Mita Mondal
Date Deposited: 22 Jan 2014 10:40 UTC
Last Modified: 04 Feb 2016 13:42 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/37829 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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