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Joining it up? Health and Wellbeing Boards in English Local Governance: Evidence from Clinical Commissioning Groups and Shadow Health and Wellbeing Boards

Coleman, Anna, Checkland, Kath, Segar, Julia, Mcdermott, Imelda, Harrison, Stephen, Peckham, Stephen (2014) Joining it up? Health and Wellbeing Boards in English Local Governance: Evidence from Clinical Commissioning Groups and Shadow Health and Wellbeing Boards. Local Government Studies, 40 (4). pp. 560-580. ISSN 0300-3930. (doi:10.1080/03003930.2013.841578) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:37795)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03003930.2013.841578

Abstract

Statutory responsibility for health care and social care has long been separated between National Health Service (NHS) bodies and local government authorities. Repeated policy attempts to promote service integration through collaboration between such authorities have achieved little. The latest of such policy interventions are the Health and Wellbeing Boards (HWBs) established by the 2012 Health and Social Care Act (HSCA) alongside a range of other organisational innovations, including Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs). These organisations await full legal and operational status but have begun to develop structures and processes. HWBs are intended to lead the integrated assessment of local needs to inform both NHS health and local authority social care commissioners. We undertook detailed qualitative case studies in eight CCGs during 2011–2012 and here report observational and interview data related to CCGs’ perspectives and observations of early HWB developments. We found that developing HWBs vary greatly in their structure and approach, but we also identified a number of significant issues that are familiar from earlier research into health and social care integration. These include heavy dependence on voluntary agreements to align the strategic plans of the many different new statutory bodies; a significant role for mundane organisational processes in determining the extent of effective co-operation; and problems arising from factors such as size and the arrangements of local boundaries.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1080/03003930.2013.841578
Additional information: Published online: 09 Jan 2014
Uncontrolled keywords: Health and Wellbeing Boards, clinical commissioning groups, Health and Social Care Act 2012, integration, public health
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Stephen Peckham
Date Deposited: 14 Jan 2014 09:18 UTC
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2019 12:03 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/37795 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Peckham, Stephen: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7002-2614
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