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Effects of standard and explicit cognitive bias modification and computer-administered cognitive-behaviour therapy on cognitive biases and social anxiety

Mobini, Sirous, Mackintosh, Bundy, Illingworth, Jo, Gega, Lina, Langdon, Peter E., Hoppitt, Laura (2014) Effects of standard and explicit cognitive bias modification and computer-administered cognitive-behaviour therapy on cognitive biases and social anxiety. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 45 (2). pp. 272-279. ISSN 0005-7916. (doi:10.1016/j.jbtep.2013.12.002) (KAR id:37792)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbtep.2013.12.002

Abstract

Background and objectives

A sample of 76 volunteers with social anxiety attended a research site. At both pre- and post-test, participants completed two computer-administered tests of interpretative and attentional biases and a self-report measure of social anxiety. Participants in the training conditions completed a single session of either standard or explicit CBM-I positive training and a c-CBT program. Participants in the Control (no training) condition completed a CBM-I neutral task matched the active CBM-I intervention in format and duration but did not encourage positive disambiguation of socially ambiguous or threatening scenarios.

Results

This study used a single session of CBM-I training, however multi-sessions intervention might result in more endurable positive CBM-I changes.

Conclusions

A computerised single session of CBM-I and an analogue of c-CBT program reduced negative interpretative biases and social anxiety.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1016/j.jbtep.2013.12.002
Uncontrolled keywords: Cognitive bias modification; Social anxiety; Computer-administered CBT; Cognitive biases
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Q Science > Q Science (General)
Divisions: Divisions > Division for the Study of Law, Society and Social Justice > School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research > Tizard
Depositing User: Peter Langdon
Date Deposited: 13 Jan 2014 12:13 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 12:50 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/37792 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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