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Environmental movements and campaigns against waste infrastructure in the United States

Rootes, Christopher, Leonard, Liam (2009) Environmental movements and campaigns against waste infrastructure in the United States. Environmental Politics, 18 (6). pp. 835-850. ISSN 0964-4016. (doi:10.1080/09644010903345611) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09644010903345611

Abstract

Campaigns against waste infrastructure in the US emerged in the 1970s against a background of increasing public anxiety about the impacts of high-tech industrialism upon the environment and human health. Independently of major environmental NGOs, and unlike earlier anti-nuclear campaigns, which also involved grassroots protests, waste campaigners quickly became networked and raised new issues of environmental justice. Initially focused upon landfills and hazardous waste, the environmental justice movement took up and amplified local protests against waste incineration. Independently of popular protest, changes in public policy and the economics of the waste industry also contributed to the unpopularity of waste incineration, and recycling regained appeal. Campaigns against waste infrastructure have contributed to the broadening of the US environmental movement as well as to ecological modernisation.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1080/09644010903345611
Additional information: Special Issue: Environmental Movements and Waste Infrastructure
Uncontrolled keywords: Environmental justice, Grassroots environmental mobilisation, Recycling, Waste facilities, Waste incineration, ecological modernization, environmental issue, environmental justice, hazardous waste, incineration, landfill, nongovernmental organization, popular protest, recycling, waste facility, waste management, United States
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Depositing User: Mita Mondal
Date Deposited: 12 Dec 2013 15:18 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 11:39 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/37529 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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