Skip to main content

The less healthy urban population: income-related health inequality in China

Yang, Wei, Kanavos, Panos (2012) The less healthy urban population: income-related health inequality in China. BMC Public Health, 12 . p. 804. ISSN 1471-2458. (doi:10.1186/1471-2458-12-804)

Abstract

Background Health inequality has been recognized as a problem all over the world. In China, the poor usually have less access to healthcare than the better-off, despite having higher levels of need. Since the proportion of the Chinese population living in urban areas increased tremendously with the urbanization movements, attention has been paid to the association between urban/rural residence and population health. It is important to understand the variation in health across income groups, and in particular to take into account the effects of urban/rural residence on the degree of income-related health inequalities. Methods This paper empirically assesses the magnitude of rural/urban disparities in income-related adult health status, i.e., self-assessed health (SAH) and physical activity limitation, using Concentration Indices. It then uses decomposition methods to unravel the causes of inequalities and their variations across urban and rural populations. Data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) 2006 are used. Results The study finds that the poor are less likely to report their health status as “excellent or good” and are more likely to have physical activity limitation. Such inequality is more pronounced for the urban population than for the rural population. Results from the decomposition analysis suggest that, for the urban population, 76.47 per cent to 79.07 per cent of inequalities are driven by non-demographic/socioeconomic-related factors, among which income, job status and educational level are the most important factors. For the rural population, 48.19 per cent to 77.78 per cent of inequalities are driven by non-demographic factors. Income and educational attainment appear to have a prominent influence on inequality. Conclusion The findings suggest that policy targeting the poor, especially the urban poor, is needed in order to reduce health inequality.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1186/1471-2458-12-804
Uncontrolled keywords: Health inequality; Adult health; Urban and rural disparity; China
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HG Finance
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Personal Social Services Research Unit
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Tony Rees
Date Deposited: 28 Nov 2013 12:01 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 11:31 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/36986 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year