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'Culture means nothing to me’: Thoughts on nature/culture in narratives of ‘full-term’ breastfeeding.

Faircloth, Charlotte (2009) 'Culture means nothing to me’: Thoughts on nature/culture in narratives of ‘full-term’ breastfeeding. Cambridge Anthropology, 28 (2). pp. 63-85. ISSN 0305-7674. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)

Abstract

What anthropologists say: Determining what is a natural age of weaning for human beings raises some problems. Human beings’ ideas about when and how to wean are often determined by culture, not necessarily by what is best or natural for babies and mothers. Anthropologists who have studied weaning have found a great variety in weaning ages, from birth (in much of the United States and Western Society in general) to age seven or eight in other cultures… Dr Dettwyler has used the example of primates to try to determine a natural weaning age for humans, since ‘gorillas and chimpanzees share more then ninety-eight percent of their genes with humans’ but are lacking the cultural biases of humans.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Depositing User: Mita Mondal
Date Deposited: 28 Nov 2013 10:59 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 11:30 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/36977 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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