What do Students Learn from a Classroom Experiment: Not much, Unless they Write a Report on it

Cartwright, Edward and Stepanova, Anna (2012) What do Students Learn from a Classroom Experiment: Not much, Unless they Write a Report on it. Journal of Economic Education, 43 (1). pp. 48-57. ISSN 0022-0485. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/00220485.2012.636710) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00220485.2012.636710

Abstract

The authors ask whether writing a report on a classroom experiment increases a student's performance in an end-of-course test. To answer this question, the authors analyzed data from a first-year undergraduate course based on classroom experiments and found that writing a report has a large positive benefit. They conclude, therefore, that it is important to constructively integrate classroom experiments with some form of assessment or homework in order to realize the maximum benefit from them.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: assessment, classroom experiments, experiment report
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HB Economic Theory
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Economics
Depositing User: Edward Cartwright
Date Deposited: 23 Nov 2013 11:52 UTC
Last Modified: 14 May 2014 12:39 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/36867 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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