The making of the risk-centred society and the limits of social risk research

Burgess, Adam (2006) The making of the risk-centred society and the limits of social risk research. Health, Risk & Society, 8 (4). pp. 329-342. ISSN 1369-8575. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/13698570601008321) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13698570601008321

Abstract

Despite the apparent triumph of social perspectives on risk, the predominant approach to risk is less social and contextual than is often supposed. A widespread acceptance of a constructionist approach is more formal than substantive. Risk 'objects' and events remain given and objectified in many accounts, at the same time as they have been subject to little critical empirical enquiry. Iconic risk events such as the BSE crisis and Chernobyl have shaped academic and policy responses to risk despite the gap between their putative and actual impacts. This editorial calls for a more interdisciplinary approach able to trace the historical evolution and changing character of risk perceptions that rigorously analyses and clearly distinguishes the scientific/technical, and socially and politically manufactured dimensions of risk.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: British risk culture, Iconic events, Objectivist, Social construction, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, chernobyl accident, clinical research, disease control, editorial, government, health care planning, health care policy, health care system, health hazard, health program, health promotion, human, mass medium, medical education, methodology, political system, psychological aspect, psychometry, risk assessment, risk benefit analysis, risk management, safety, social aspect, social behavior, United Kingdom
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Depositing User: Mita Mondal
Date Deposited: 18 Nov 2013 11:13 UTC
Last Modified: 24 Apr 2014 10:40 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/36542 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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