Media risk campaigning in the UK: From mobile phones to 'Baby P'

Burgess, Adam (2010) Media risk campaigning in the UK: From mobile phones to 'Baby P'. Journal of Risk Research, 13 (1). pp. 59-72. ISSN 1366-9877. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/13669870903136035) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13669870903136035

Abstract

A distinctive risk campaigning by particular British media emerged in the late 1990s through three issues: mobile phones, genetically modified organisms and the campaign to expose sex offenders. Subsequently such campaigning has become normalised and generalised, culminating with the 2008 campaign to attribute blame for the death of the murdered child, 'Baby P'. Their distinctive evolution and characteristics are considered. Central to their success and subsequent generalisation is the encouragement provided by increasing government responsiveness and accommodation. The BSE crisis created a political orientation to engage with public anxiety that in these cases meant engagement with campaigning media. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Campaigning, Government, Health, Media, Newspapers, Risk, Campaigning, Generalisation, Genetically modified organisms, Government, Political orientation, Mobile devices, Mobile phones, Newsprint, Telephone, Telephone sets, Health risks
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Depositing User: Mita Mondal
Date Deposited: 18 Nov 2013 10:58 UTC
Last Modified: 13 May 2014 13:48 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/36539 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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