Subtle attentional deficits in the absence of dementia are associated with an increased risk of post-operative delirium

Lowery, David and Wesnes, Keith and Ballard, Clive G. (2007) Subtle attentional deficits in the absence of dementia are associated with an increased risk of post-operative delirium. Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, 23 (6). pp. 390-394. ISSN 1420-8008. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1159/000101453) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000101453

Abstract

Background: Previously, key studies of the risk profile for post-surgical delirium have focused on general medical and non-elective patients, few have examined elective cohorts. Accurate prediction is imperative for clinical trials and prevention strategies. Aims/Hypothesis: Our hypothesis was that subtle pre-operative impairments of attention will be associated with risk of post-operative delirium. Method: A prospective study evaluating pre- and post-operative neuropsychological performance in older (≧70) consecutive elective admissions for orthopaedic surgery, and free of dementia (n = 100) was initiated in a general medical hospital. Results: Pre-operative attentional deficits were closely associated with delirium. Patients who developed post-surgical delirium had significantly slower mean reaction times (p ≤ 0.011) and greater variability of reaction time (p = 0.017). A 4- to 5-fold increased risk of delirium was observed for people one standard deviation above the sample means on these variables. Conclusions: The present study describes a measurement of attentional performance which could form the basis of a neuropsychological marker of delirium.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC952 Geriatrics
R Medicine > RD Surgery
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Tony Rees
Date Deposited: 15 Nov 2013 14:58 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2014 13:49 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/36489 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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