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Nursing attitudes to the psychiatric treatment of people with intellectual disabilities: relationship to expressed emotion, burnout, and coping within a medium secure unit

Langdon, Peter E., Yaguez, Lidia, Kuipers, Elizabeth (2004) Nursing attitudes to the psychiatric treatment of people with intellectual disabilities: relationship to expressed emotion, burnout, and coping within a medium secure unit. In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research. 48 (4/5). p. 301. Blackwell (doi:10.1111/j.1365-2788.2004.t01-1-00604.x) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:36283)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2788.2004.t01-1-0...

Abstract

Aim: To explore how treatment attitudes of nursing and care staff relate to job satisfaction, burnout and coping skills and subsequently, how these impact the relationship that nursing and care staff have with their patients.

Method: Within the current study, the treatment attitudes, levels of occupational burnout and coping skills were measured among 40 nursing and care staff working

within a medium secure hospital for people with ID. Nursing and care staff also completed the five-minute-speech-sample regarding 50 patients which was used to provide a measure of expressed emotion (EE). Additional patient data, which includes intellectual functioning, language ability, and severity of challenging behaviour, was also collected.

Results: Staff reporting high EE also had a tendency to score higher on the Attitudes toward Treatment Questionnaire, suggesting the endorsement of more ‘organic’ treatment attitudes. Those with high EE also scored higher on Depersonalisation, while scoring lower on Emotional Exhaustion, suggesting that there may be some sort of a relationship between EE and burnout.

Conclusions: This will be further explored as these results are preliminary and based on a small sample size.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Lecture)
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/j.1365-2788.2004.t01-1-00604.x
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Divisions > Division for the Study of Law, Society and Social Justice > School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research
Divisions > Division for the Study of Law, Society and Social Justice > School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research > Tizard
Depositing User: Peter Langdon
Date Deposited: 13 Nov 2013 13:48 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 12:49 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/36283 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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