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The efficacy of the self-paced V?O2max test to measure maximal oxygen uptake in treadmill running

Mauger, Alexis R., Metcalfe, Alan J., Taylor, Lee, Castle, Paul C. (2013) The efficacy of the self-paced V?O2max test to measure maximal oxygen uptake in treadmill running. Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, 38 (12). pp. 1211-1216. ISSN 1715-5312. (doi:10.1139/apnm-2012-0384) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/apnm-2012-0384

Abstract

The novel self-paced, cycle-based maximal oxygen uptake (V?O2max) test (SPV) has been shown to produce higher V?O2max values than standard graded exercise test (GXT) protocols. This study sought to ascertain whether these observations would also be apparent in a self-paced, treadmill-based test design. Fourteen trained male runners performed a standard GXT on a motorised treadmill and a self-paced V?O2max test on a nonmotorised treadmill in a counter-balanced design. The GXT included a plateau verification and was designed to last between 8 and 12 min. The self-paced test included 5 × 2 min stages and allowed participants to set their own running speed based on fixed increments in rating of perceived exertion. Significantly higher V?O2max values (t[13] = 3.71, p = 0.003) were achieved in the self-paced test (64.4 ± 7.3 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) compared with the GXT (61.3 ± 7.3 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)), and 13 of the 14 participants achieved the same or higher V?O2max values in the self-paced test. Higher (p = 0.01) maximum heart rates were observed in the GXT (191 ± 10 beats·min(-1) vs. 187 ± 7 beats·min(-1)), but no differences were observed in any other recorded variables. The self-paced V?O2max test may provide a more valid means of measuring V?O2max than the GXT and suggests that a V?O2 plateau during a GXT does not always signify achievement of a definitive V?O2max. These results provide further support that self-paced V?O2max testing produces higher values for maximal oxygen uptake.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1139/apnm-2012-0384
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology (Living systems)
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: Lex Mauger
Date Deposited: 12 Nov 2013 16:21 UTC
Last Modified: 23 Jan 2020 04:07 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/36248 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Mauger, Alexis R.: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6685-5800
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