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The influence of acetaminophen on repeated sprint cycling performance

Foster, Josh, Taylor, Lee, Chrismas, Bryna C. R., Watkins, Samuel L., Mauger, Alexis R. (2014) The influence of acetaminophen on repeated sprint cycling performance. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 114 (1). pp. 41-48. ISSN 1439-6319. (doi:10.1007/s00421-013-2746-0) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:36246)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided.
Official URL:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-013-2746-0

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acetaminophen on repeated sprint cycling performance.

METHODS:

Nine recreationally active male participants completed a graded exercise test, a familiarisation set of Wingate Anaerobic Tests (WAnTs) and two experimental sets of WAnTs (8 × 30 s sprints, 2 min active rest intervals). In the experimental WAnTs, participants ingested either 1.5 g acetaminophen or a placebo in a double-blind, randomised, crossover design. During the WAnT trials, participants provided ratings of perceived pain 20 s into each sprint. Mean and peak power output and heart rate were recorded immediately following each sprint, and percentage decrement in mean power output was subsequently calculated.

RESULTS:

Participants cycled at a significantly greater mean power output over the course of 8 WAnTs (p < 0.05) following the ingestion of acetaminophen (391 ± 74 vs. 372 ± 90 W), due to a significantly greater mean power output during sprints 6, 7 and 8 (p < 0.05). Percentage decrements in mean power output were also significantly reduced (p < 0.05) following acetaminophen ingestion (17 ± 14 vs. 24 ± 17 %). No significant differences in peak power output, perceived pain or heart rate were observed between conditions.

CONCLUSION:

Acetaminophen may have improved performance through the reduction of pain for a given work rate, thereby enabling participants to exercise closer to a true physiological limit. These results suggest that exercise may be regulated by pain perception, and that an increased pain tolerance can improve exercise performance.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1007/s00421-013-2746-0
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology (Living systems)
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: Lex Mauger
Date Deposited: 12 Nov 2013 16:17 UTC
Last Modified: 17 Aug 2022 10:56 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/36246 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)

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