Skip to main content

Effect of gradient on cycling gross efficiency and technique.

Arkesteijn, Marco, Jobson, Simon A., Hopker, James G., Passfield, Louis (2013) Effect of gradient on cycling gross efficiency and technique. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 45 (5). pp. 920-6. ISSN 0195-9131. (doi:10.1249/MSS.0b013e31827d1bdb) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:36034)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e31827d1bdb

Abstract

PURPOSE

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of gradient on cycling gross efficiency and pedaling technique.

METHODS

Eighteen trained cyclists were tested for efficiency, index of pedal force effectiveness (IFE), distribution of power production during the pedal revolution (dead center size [DC]), and timing and level of muscle activity of eight leg muscles. Cycling was performed on a treadmill at gradients of 0% (level), 4%, and 8%, each at three different cadences (60, 75, and 90 rev·min).

RESULTS

Efficiency was significantly decreased at a gradient of 8% compared with both 0% and 4% (P < 0.05). The relationship between cadence and efficiency was not changed by gradient (P > 0.05). At a gradient of 8%, there was a larger IFE between 45° and 225° and larger DC, compared with 0% and 4% (P < 0.05). The onset of muscle activity for vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, gastrocnemius lateralis, and gastrocnemius medialis occurred earlier with increasing gradient (all P < 0.05), whereas none of the muscles showed a change in offset (P > 0.05). Uphill cycling increased the overall muscle activity level (P < 0.05), mainly induced by increased calf muscle activity.

CONCLUSIONS

These results suggest that uphill cycling decreases cycling gross efficiency and is associated with changes in pedaling technique.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e31827d1bdb
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports medicine
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: James Hopker
Date Deposited: 05 Nov 2013 20:52 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 12:48 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/36034 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Hopker, James G.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4786-7037
Passfield, Louis: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6223-162X
  • Depositors only (login required):