Detecting the presence of large biomass particles in pneumatic conveying pipelines using an acoustic sensor

Sun, Duo and Yan, Yong and Carter, Robert M. and Lu, Gang and Riley, Gerry and Wood, Matthew (2013) Detecting the presence of large biomass particles in pneumatic conveying pipelines using an acoustic sensor. In: 2013 IEEE International Instrumentation and Measurement Technology Conference (I2MTC). pp. 1487-1490. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1109/I2MTC.2013.6555661) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/I2MTC.2013.6555661

Abstract

This paper proposes a novel approach to online automatic detection of the presence of large biomass particles in a pneumatic conveying pipeline using an acoustic emission sensor and time-frequency analysis techniques. The acoustic sensor is used to capture the sound emitted from the collisions between biomass particles and pipe wall. Time-frequency analysis technique is used to eliminate environmental noise from the acoustic signal, extract the revealing information about the collisions, and identify the large particles. The acoustic sensor together with its signal conditioning unit is integrated into a compact enclosure, which can be easily attached to the outer face of a pneumatic pipeline. Experimental results obtained from an industrial pneumatic conveyor demonstrate the method works well and results are promising.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Paper)
Subjects: T Technology
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Engineering and Digital Arts
Faculties > Sciences > School of Engineering and Digital Arts > Instrumentation, Control and Embedded Systems
Depositing User: Tina Thompson
Date Deposited: 01 Nov 2013 14:32 UTC
Last Modified: 04 Dec 2013 10:03 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/35928 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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