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Long-run Effects of Severe Economic Recessions: Drastic Changes in Working Hours and Male BMI Trajectories

Nizalova, Olena (2013) Long-run Effects of Severe Economic Recessions: Drastic Changes in Working Hours and Male BMI Trajectories. In: IHEA 9th World Congress on Health Economics, July 2013, Sydney, Australia. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:35639)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
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Abstract

The recent economic downturn has inspired researchers to revisit earlier literature [started by Ruhm (2000)] documenting that mortality decreases during economic recessions. Ruhm (2005) demonstrates that during the hard times people smoke less and lose weight. Moreover, these changes in behavior disproportionately occur among heavy smokers and severely obese individuals. At the same time, those who were completely physically inactive become more likely to exercise.

Ukraine has the fastest rate of depopulation in Europe. Premature mortality of Ukrainian prime-age males is one of the major contributors to this pattern. The leading cause of death and disability is cardio-vascular disease (67% of all deaths in 2009), which is closely related to hypertension, obesity, and tobacco use. A recent health survey shows that hypertension prevalence among males is 30 percent and almost 50 percent of them are unaware of having this condition, 12 percent of males are obese and 50 percent are overweight. At the same time more than 60 percent of them are daily smokers.

We use growth curve approach to model the trajectory of BMI by age. These models can help control for selection by allowing the differences in the initial levels of BMI (intercept) and in slopes of the BMI-age trajectories to vary with individual future working hours: those who significantly increased working hours, those who significantly decreased working hours, and those who preserved same number of working hours. To address the issue of endogeneity, we use local labor market conditions as instruments for changes in individual working hours and the history of local labor market conditions as an instrument for the history of individual labor market shocks.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Paper)
Uncontrolled keywords: obesity, labor market shocks, BMI trajectories, working hours
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare > HV5001 Alcoholism and intemperance
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Personal Social Services Research Unit
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Olena Nizalova
Date Deposited: 25 Oct 2013 11:25 UTC
Last Modified: 28 Oct 2019 10:07 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/35639 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Nizalova, Olena: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1704-2632
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