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Sources of parental burden in a UK sample of first-generation North Indian Punjabi Sikhs and their white British counterparts

Lloyd, Helen, Singh, Pratima, Merritt, Rowena K., Shetty, Adarsh, Singh, Swaran, Burns, Tom (2013) Sources of parental burden in a UK sample of first-generation North Indian Punjabi Sikhs and their white British counterparts. International Journal of Social Psychiatry, 59 (2). pp. 147-158. ISSN 0020-7640. (doi:10.1177/0020764011427241) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0020764011427241

Abstract

Abstract OBJECTIVE: The correlates of parental burden in schizophrenia may differ between ethnic groups, but few studies have examined this in a UK setting. Our aim was to identify the correlates of burden in a UK sample of first-generation North Indian Punjabi Sikh parents and their white British counterparts. METHOD: Test the association of burden with a series of clinical, social and service use variables and control for potential confounding factors in a model predicting drivers of burden in a combined sample of the above. RESULTS: The strongest correlates of burden were patient symptoms and parental distress. Differences in correlates of burden between the groups emerged when individual components of service use and parental social network were tested. The group comparisons also revealed differences in expressed emotion (EE) and social networks. CONCLUSION: The similarities in sources of burden between the groups could be explained by a commonality of sociocultural and economic experience, resulting from the successful acculturation and affluence of this British Sikh group. The differences between the groups may be related to enduring cultural factors such as kin support, since larger family groups were associated with low burden in the British Sikh group. The nature of EE in this British Sikh group may explain why it was not associated with burden in this sample.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1177/0020764011427241
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
J Political Science > JV Colonies and colonization. Emigration and immigration. International migration
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Tony Rees
Date Deposited: 21 Oct 2013 09:25 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 11:08 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/35543 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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