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Introduction: Special issue on group processes and aggression [Editorial]

Gannon, Theresa A., Wood, Jane L. (2010) Introduction: Special issue on group processes and aggression [Editorial]. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 15 (2). pp. 85-86. ISSN 1359-1789. (doi:10.1016/j.avb.2009.11.002) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.avb.2009.11.002

Abstract

This special issue of Aggression and Violent Behavior focuses on group processes and the relationship of such processes to both the facilitation and reduction of aggression. In this special issue, we include a variety of offences under the general rubric of “aggression” including sexual offences, physical violence, bullying, and terrorist acts. Thus, a key issue underpinning this special issue relates to group perpetration of these aggressive behaviors, and the mechanisms within the group context that contribute towards—and maintain—these aggressive behaviors. Further key issues that naturally emanate from such discussions include how such aggression may be reduced through our knowledge of group processes. In short then, this special issue points to the ways in which we can use our knowledge of group processes in order to reduce aggression. The first, and most obvious is to develop strategies to reduce naturally occurring group processes so as to reduce aggression. The second involves using current knowledge of group processes to further develop our general therapeutic group work with a whole variety of offenders who may or may not have behaved aggressively within the group context. What matters here, then, is not whether the individual offended within a group, but how we can use current knowledge of group processes to further inform and improve our group therapy with offenders.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1016/j.avb.2009.11.002
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Centre of Research & Education in Forensic Psychology
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Theresa Gannon
Date Deposited: 05 Sep 2013 14:18 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 11:01 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/35127 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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