Rape supportive cognition, sexual fantasies and implicit offence scripts: A comparison between high and low rape prone men

Bartels, Ross M. and Gannon, Theresa A. (2009) Rape supportive cognition, sexual fantasies and implicit offence scripts: A comparison between high and low rape prone men. Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand, 2 (1). pp. 14-20. ISSN 1833-8488. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

It is widely accepted that sexual fantasy can play a role in the aetiology of rape, and it has often been shown that dominant fantasies correlate positively with rape supportive attitudes in men with a proclivity to rape. Furthermore, it has been suggested that frequent use of deviant fantasy can lead to the creation of an implicit-offence script that, if acted out, would constitute a sexual offence. Thus, the aim of the present study was to provide support for the hypotheses that: (1) high rape prone men would report more rape supportive attitudes and dominant fantasies in contrast to men with a low rape proclivity; (2) dominant fantasies are influenced by rape supportive attitudes; and (3) high rape prone men will show more evidence of harbouring implicit-offence scripts. The results supported the first two hypotheses but not the third. Various explanations are offered for these results alongside a discussion of the potential limitations of the study and future research suggestions.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Centre of Research & Education in Forensic Psychology
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Theresa Gannon
Date Deposited: 05 Sep 2013 12:42 UTC
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 17:01 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/35109 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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