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Immanent justice reasoning: Theory, research, and current directions.

Callan, Mitch J., Sutton, Robbie M., Harvey, Annelie J., Dawtry, Rael J. (2014) Immanent justice reasoning: Theory, research, and current directions. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 49 . p. 392. ISSN 9780128000526. E-ISSN 9780128003589. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
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Abstract

Immanent justice reasoning involves causally attributing a deserved outcome to someone’s prior moral deeds or character, even when such a causal connection is physically implausible. This chapter describes a body of work showing that immanent justice reasoning is (a) motivated, in part, by the need to construe outcomes as deserved; (b) driven by intuitive more than controlled mental processes; and (c) more openly expressed among individuals who believe in supernatural phenomena. This review also documents several additional lines of inquiry exploring key assumptions about the nature, origins, and functions of immanent justice reasoning, including immanent justice reasoning for self-relevant fortuitous outcomes, the social-communicative function of immanent justice reasoning, and the interplay between immanent justice and normative causal reasoning. Early research portrayed immanent justice reasoning as unique to children, but the chapter identifies several conditions under which it is predictably displayed by adults. Immanent justice reasoning serves important psychological functions in adulthood, and is underpinned by reasoning processes and metaphysical assumptions that are not put away when children become adults.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: immanent justice reasoning, just-world belief, causal attribution, implicit processes, motivated social cognition, magical thinking
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Social Psychology
Depositing User: Robbie Sutton
Date Deposited: 22 Aug 2013 11:22 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 10:59 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/35005 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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