Moral Panic: Its Origins in Resistance, Ressentiment and the Translation of Fantasy into Reality

Young, Jock (2009) Moral Panic: Its Origins in Resistance, Ressentiment and the Translation of Fantasy into Reality. British Journal of Criminology, 49 (1). pp. 4-16. ISSN 1464-3529. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azn074) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azn074

Abstract

This paper addresses: the origins of moral panic in the New Deviancy Theory of the 1960s, particularly in the work of Albert Cohen and his notion of moral indignation which is rooted in the Nietzschian concept of Ressentiment; the emergence of the concept in the tumult of 1968 and in the intellectual context of the National Deviancy Conference; the key attributes of moral panic as arising out of fundamental changes in social structure and culture; and issues of moral disturbance because of conflicts in values. It concludes with a critique of recent uses of the concept and a reformulation of the notions of moral disturbance, disproportionality, displacement and volatility.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Depositing User: Mita Mondal
Date Deposited: 08 Jul 2013 09:05 UTC
Last Modified: 14 Apr 2014 15:38 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/34549 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):