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Dementia Screening and Early Diagnosis: the case for and against

Milne, Alisoun (2010) Dementia Screening and Early Diagnosis: the case for and against. Health, Risk & Society, 12 (1). pp. 65-76. ISSN 1369-8575. (doi:10.1080/13698570903509497) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13698570903509497

Abstract

Over 700,000 people have dementia in the UK. There is increasing policy and practice consensus that early intervention in identifying and treating dementia is beneficial and that much can be done therapeutically and practically to help users and their relatives at an early stage. Research evidences early diagnosis as allowing users the chance to come to terms with it when they can still understand its implications. It also provides an opportunity for key decisions to be made and is what the majority of people want. However, early diagnosis also carries risks: loss of status, acquisition of a stigmatising label, loss of employment and, for a minority, depression. Not all users want to know they have dementia; the diagnosis may also be incorrect. Evidence from the field of medical sociology offers a different perspective on the early intervention debate suggesting not only that targeting ‘well’ older people at possible risk of dementia may be the latest product of surveillance medicine but that efforts to resist being diagnosed may represent strategies to challenge medical intrusion, knowledge and power. Further, the imposition by an older person and their family of their individualised values onto the clinical encounter may be viewed as an attempt to import user generated forms of knowledge into a medically managed process and provide a nuanced approach to defining, and dealing with, risks. Accommodating both perspectives in practice development may hold considerable potential to enhance the nature of care and the quality of lives of people with dementia and their families.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1080/13698570903509497
Uncontrolled keywords: dementia screening, early intervention, medical surveillance, risk assessment
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Depositing User: Mita Mondal
Date Deposited: 01 Jul 2013 14:00 UTC
Last Modified: 01 Aug 2019 10:35 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/34474 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Milne, Alisoun: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0977-8156
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