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Visibility and invisibility of migrant faith in the city: diaspora religion and the politics of emplacement of Afro-Christian churches.

Garbin, David (2013) Visibility and invisibility of migrant faith in the city: diaspora religion and the politics of emplacement of Afro-Christian churches. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 39 (5). pp. 677-696. ISSN 1369-183X. (doi:10.1080/1369183X.2013.756658) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1369183X.2013.756658

Abstract

In today's post-industrial city, migrants and ethnic minorities are forming, through their religious practices, particular spaces of alterity, often at the ‘margin’ of the urban experience—for instance, in converting anonymous warehouses into places of worship. This paper examines diverse facets of the religious spatiality of Afro-Christian diasporic churches—from local emplacement to the more visible public parade of faith in the urban landscape. One of the aims is to explore to what extent particular spatial configurations and locations constitute ‘objective expression’ of social status and symbolic positionalities in the post-migration secular environment of the ‘host societies’. Without denying the impact of urban marginality, the paper shows how religious groups such as African Pentecostal and Prophetic churches are also engaged, in their own terms, in a transformative project of spatial appropriation, regeneration and re-enchantment of the urban landscape. The case study of the Congolese Kimbanguist Church in London and Atlanta also demonstrates the need to examine the articulation of local, transnational and global practices and imaginaries to understand how religious and ethnic identities are renegotiated in newly ‘localised’ diasporic settings.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1080/1369183X.2013.756658
Uncontrolled keywords: Diaspore Religion, African Churches, Urban Space, Pentecostalism, Kimbanguism
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Depositing User: Mita Mondal
Date Deposited: 26 Jun 2013 09:55 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2020 04:07 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/34415 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Garbin, David: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6599-6791
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