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Scylla, the Diver’s Daughter: Aeschrion, Hedyle, and Ovid

Lowe, Dunstan (2011) Scylla, the Diver’s Daughter: Aeschrion, Hedyle, and Ovid. Classical Philology, 106 (3). pp. 260-264. ISSN 0009-837X. (doi:10.1086/661547) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/661547

Abstract

Ovid has been thought the inventor of the story that Scylla, the Odyssean monster, was once a beautiful nymph subsequently disfigured by a jealous goddess. I argue that this Hellenistic-sounding narrative had a Hellenistic origin, specifically in the lost works of Aeschrion and Hedyle. I propose that the element spliced with Homer's monster is not (primarily) princess Scylla of Megara, as some have claimed, but instead the daughter of Scyllias, the diver who reputedly sabotaged the Persian fleet at Artemisium.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1086/661547
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PA Classical philology
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of European Culture and Languages > Classical and Archaeological Studies
Depositing User: Dunstan Lowe
Date Deposited: 22 Jun 2013 16:23 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 10:19 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/34365 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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