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Do ambush predators prefer rewarding or non-rewarding orchid inflorescences?

Roberts, David L., Bateman, Richard M. (2007) Do ambush predators prefer rewarding or non-rewarding orchid inflorescences? Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 92 (4). pp. 763-771. ISSN 00244066 (ISSN). (doi:10.1111/j.1095-8312.2007.00938.x) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8312.2007.00938.x

Abstract

Previous research has shown that the presence of a reward on average doubles reproductive success in orchids by correspondingly increasing the frequency of pollinator visitations. We examined whether such reward-induced increases have a downstream effect on the behaviour of ambush predators concealed in orchid inflorescences, extending observations begun at Downe by Charles Darwin. Specifically, we studied three orchid-rich sites in southern England, in order to compare the occurrence of crab spiders on three coexisting species of terrestrial orchids: the nectariferous Gymnadenia conopsea versus the nectar-less Dactylorhiza fuchsii and Anacamptis pyramidalis. No significant difference was observed between rewarding and non-rewarding inflorescences at Risborough, whereas at Aston Clinton the nectar-less species supported significantly more crab spiders, albeit mainly in relatively short grass. Comparison of the two non-rewarding species present at Downe approximated a significant preference by the spiders for Anacamptis, which more closely resembles the rewarding Gymnadenia. The presence of a floral reward does not result in a higher frequency of crab spiders. We speculate that concealment quality of the inflorescence, the nature of the dominant pollinator(s), and/or ease of movement of spiders between inflorescences may be more important than frequency of visits by potential prey, particularly when no other form of concealment is readily available. © 2007 The Linnean Society of London.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/j.1095-8312.2007.00938.x
Additional information: Unmapped bibliographic data: PY - 2007/// [EPrints field already has value set] AD - Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 3AB, United Kingdom [Field not mapped to EPrints] JA - Biol. J. Linn. Soc. [Field not mapped to EPrints]
Uncontrolled keywords: Anacamptis, Crab spider, Dactylorhiza, Floral predator, Gymnadenia, Nectar, Orchidaceae, Tritrophic interaction, adaptation, behavioral response, coexistence, comparative study, floral trait, monocotyledon, nectar, pollination, predation, spider, tritrophic interaction, Aston Clinton, Bromley, Buckinghamshire, Downe, England, Eurasia, Europe, London [England], Princes Risborough, United Kingdom, Western Europe, Anacamptis, Anacamptis pyramidalis, Araneae, Dactylorhiza, Dactylorhiza fuchsii, Decapoda (Crustacea), Gymnadenia, Gymnadenia conopsea, Orchidaceae, Thomisidae
Subjects: Q Science
Q Science > QH Natural history
Q Science > QK Botany
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: David Roberts
Date Deposited: 20 Feb 2014 15:28 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 10:10 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/33832 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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