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A social psychological study of ethnonyms: Cognitive representation of the ingroup and intergroup hostility

Mullen, Brian, Calogero, Rachel M., Leader, Tirza (2007) A social psychological study of ethnonyms: Cognitive representation of the ingroup and intergroup hostility. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 92 (4). pp. 612-630. ISSN 0022-3514. (doi:10.1037/0022-3514.92.4.612)

Abstract

Ethnonyms (M. G. Levin & L. P. Potapov, 1964; from the Greek roots meaning "a national group" and "name") are the names an in-group uses to distinguish itself from out-groups. There has been no social psychological research to date exploring the effects of ethnonyms. The authors report the results of 3 studies examining the potential effects of various features of ethnonyms on intergroup behavior. Analyses of archival data indicate that among indigenous African cultures (Study 1), indigenous Native American cultures (Study 2), and African Americans (Study 3), intergroup hostility was greater among in-groups characterized by less complex ethnonyms. Discussion considers the implications of these results and suggests new directions for research in the social psychological study of ethnonyms.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1037/0022-3514.92.4.612
Uncontrolled keywords: ethnonyms; complexity; intergroup hostility
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Social Psychology
Depositing User: R. Calogero
Date Deposited: 14 Mar 2013 15:23 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 10:03 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/33408 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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