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Self-subjugation among women: Exposure to sexist ideology, self-objectification, and the protective function of the need to avoid closure.

Calogero, Rachel M., Jost, John T. (2011) Self-subjugation among women: Exposure to sexist ideology, self-objectification, and the protective function of the need to avoid closure. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 100 (2). pp. 211-228. ISSN 0022-3514. (doi:10.1037/a0021864)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0021864

Abstract

Despite extensive evidence confirming the negative consequences of self-objectification, direct experimental evidence concerning its environmental antecedents is scarce. Incidental exposure to sexist cues was employed in 3 experiments to investigate its effect on self-objectification variables. Consistent with system justification theory, exposure to benevolent and complementary forms of sexism, but not hostile or no sexism, increased state self-objectification, self-surveillance, and body shame among women but not men in Experiment 1. In Experiment 2, we replicated these effects and demonstrated that they are specific to self-objectification and not due to a more general self-focus. In addition, following exposure to benevolent sexism only, women planned more future behaviors pertaining to appearance management than did men; this effect was mediated by self-surveillance and body shame. Experiment 3 revealed that the need to avoid closure might afford women some protection against self-objectification in the context of sexist ideology.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1037/a0021864
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Social Psychology
Depositing User: R. Calogero
Date Deposited: 14 Mar 2013 15:19 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 10:03 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/33407 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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