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Adaptive Responsibilities: Non-linear Interactions Across Social Sectors: Cases from Cross Sector Social Partnerships

Seitanidi, M.May (2008) Adaptive Responsibilities: Non-linear Interactions Across Social Sectors: Cases from Cross Sector Social Partnerships. Emergence: Complexity and Organization, 10 (3). pp. 51-64. ISSN 1521-3250. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)

Abstract

This paper presents an instance of failed large scale social innovation from a cross sector social partnership even though the partnership seemed to succeed in its narrow mission. The mechanisms that led to less than complete success can shed light on the reasons behind the failure of social change mechanisms. The case study presented is between a non-profit organization and a business. It demonstrates that when the strategic intent of the social actors is prescriptive, it imprisons the possibilities for fundamental change. This limitation is due to the pre-defined relatively narrow responsibilities associated with different individual or social agents. The paper is calling to move beyond reactive and proactive responsibilities and to shift towards accepting adaptive responsibilities that require a multidimensional understanding towards all three levels of analysis, micro, meso and macro. Adaptive responsibilities is an empowering approach based on the coevolution of organizational actors. It holds the seeds of reciprocal multi-level change.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School
Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School > Marketing
Depositing User: M. May Seitanidi
Date Deposited: 18 Jan 2013 12:30 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 09:57 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/33025 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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