Skip to main content

“Exploring the Paradoxical Consequences of State Collapse: The Cases of Somalia 1991-2006 and Lebanon 1975-1982” Third World Quarterly 33(7) 2012

Kurtulus, Ersun N (2012) “Exploring the Paradoxical Consequences of State Collapse: The Cases of Somalia 1991-2006 and Lebanon 1975-1982” Third World Quarterly 33(7) 2012. Third World Quarterly, 33 (7). pp. 1285-1303. ISSN 0143-6597. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0143659...

Abstract

Relative social and economic well-being in the aftermath of a state's collapse is usually explained on the basis of a single case, Somalia, and with reference to the impact of endogenous factors such as the repressive and predatory nature of the state which collapsed and the ability of civil society actors and institutions to fulfil those functions that are normally performed by a state. This article challenges this theoretical view. As can be seen from a study of Lebanon, relative well-being after state collapse is more common than it appears to be at first glance. Moreover, given the limited role that the Lebanese state played in the economic and political spheres before the breakdown of state authority in 1975, the repressive and predatory nature of the collapsed state cannot be the explanatory variable in this case. Exogenous factors, such as remittances from abroad, international loans bestowed upon residual state institutions and ‘political money’ from foreign powers, are the decisive factors generating such paradoxical developments. Study of Somalia and Lebanon also shows the limitations of the conceptualisations of state collapse prevalent in the literature.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: J Political Science
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations
Depositing User: Ersun Kurtulus
Date Deposited: 17 Jan 2013 13:51 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 09:57 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/32995 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):