The new hundred years wars

Feron, Elise and Hastings, Michel (2003) The new hundred years wars. International Social Science Journal, 55 (177). pp. 489-500. ISSN 0020-8701. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)

Abstract

This aticle advances the idea that community conflicts, the resurgence of which at the present time is bringing the issue of unrealised group identities to the fore, seem to produce a fiction of never-ending war. The whole of their internal structure appears to induce the protagonists to settle in for the long term and to perpetuate confrontations by constantly re-enacting a sort of primitive and ageless conflict. These new Hundred Years Wars would seem to be generated by three main contributing factors: first, the ritualisation of violent practices which bind enemies together in a pact of reciprocal cruelty; next, the adoption of a rhetorical stance proclaiming that negotiation is impossible and unthinkable, thus enabling each party to present its own struggle as part of the unshakeable defence of the honour of the threatened community; and, lastly, the extension of conflicts by making a habit of division, of hate-filled exhortations and of memory games which cut across each and every kind of social activity, creating a sort of spontaneous apartheid society. It is to be asked whether this shared fantasy of the impossibility of peace might not also ultimately stem from a painful need for recognition.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: J Political Science > JZ International relations
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations > Conflict Analysis Research Centre
Depositing User: Elise Feron
Date Deposited: 12 Jan 2013 14:30 UTC
Last Modified: 28 Nov 2014 15:22 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/32944 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):