Is race a ‘salient’ or ‘dominant identity’ in the early 21st century. The evidence of UK survey data on respondents’ sense of who they are

Aspinall, Peter J. and Song, Miri (2013) Is race a ‘salient’ or ‘dominant identity’ in the early 21st century. The evidence of UK survey data on respondents’ sense of who they are. Social Science Research, 42 (2). pp. 547-561. ISSN 0049-089X. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ssresearch.2012.10.007) (Full text available)

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Abstract

The term ‘master status’, coined by Everett Hughes in 1945 with special reference to race, was conceptualised as one which, in most social situations, will dominate all others. Since then race and other collective social identities have become key features of people’s lives, shaping their ‘life scripts’. But is race still a ‘master’ or ‘dominant identity’ and, if not, what has replaced it? Analyses of recent social surveys show that race has lost its position to family, religion (in the South Asian and Black groups) and (amongst young mixed race people) also age/life-stage and study/work. However, many of these different identity attributes are consistently selected, suggesting the possibility – confirmed in in-depth interviews – that they may work through each other via intersectionality. In Britain race appears to have been undermined by the rise of ‘Muslim’ identity, the increasing importance of ‘mixed race’, and the fragmentation of identity now increasingly interwoven with other attributes like religion.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Master status; Salient identity; Race; Ethnicity; Surveys; Mixed race
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BL Religion
H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Tony Rees
Date Deposited: 14 Dec 2012 09:47 UTC
Last Modified: 11 Feb 2016 09:52 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/32799 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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