Children’s Selective Learning from Others

Nurmsoo, Erika and Robinson, Elizabeth J. and Butterfill, Stephen A. (2010) Children’s Selective Learning from Others. Review of Philosophy and Psychology, 1 (4). pp. 551-561. ISSN 1878-5158. (doi:10.1007/s13164-010-0043-y) (Full text available)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13164-010-0043-y

Abstract

Psychological research into children’s sensitivity to testimony has primarily focused on their ability to judge the likely reliability of speakers. However, verbal testimony is only one means by which children learn from others. We review recent research exploring children’s early social referencing and imitation, as well as their sensitivity to speakers’ knowledge, beliefs, and biases, to argue that children treat information and informants with reasonable scepticism. As children’s understanding of mental states develops, they become ever more able to critically evaluate whether to believe new information.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Erika Nurmsoo
Date Deposited: 02 Nov 2012 18:11 UTC
Last Modified: 27 Feb 2016 16:01 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/32068 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
ORCiD (Nurmsoo, Erika): http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2868-286X
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