William Froude, John Henry Newman and scientific practice in the culture of Victorian doubt

Leggett, Don (2013) William Froude, John Henry Newman and scientific practice in the culture of Victorian doubt. English Historical Review, 128 (532). pp. 571-595. ISSN 0013-8266. E-ISSN 1477-4534. (doi:10.1093/ehr/cet066) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ehr/cet066

Abstract

This article explores the relationship between scientific practice and doubt in Victorian Britain. When compared to the rich historiography of Victorian science and religion, our current image of science and doubt is strikingly monolithic and limiting. Science is treated largely as a stimulus to narratives of doubt, for example, in the form of geology and evolution. This study, focused on the mathematician and mechanic William Froude and his close friend John Henry Newman, reconsiders the various levels on which doubts shaped scientific practice and informed the criteria by which knowledge of the physical and spiritual world were deemed certain and trustworthy.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: D History General and Old World > D History (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of History
Depositing User: Zoe Denness
Date Deposited: 02 Oct 2012 09:59
Last Modified: 23 Mar 2016 15:16
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/31135 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):