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Using event-related potentials to distinguish mirror effect types: Evidence from a modified directed forgetting procedure (item-method) {A}bstract.

Dietz, Kristina Charlotte and Van Hooff, Johanna C. and Bowman, Howard (2010) Using event-related potentials to distinguish mirror effect types: Evidence from a modified directed forgetting procedure (item-method) {A}bstract. In: Frings, C. and Mecklinger, A. and Wentura, D. and Zimmer, H., eds. Beiträge zur 52. Tagung experimentell arbeitender Psychologen. Pabst Science Publishers, Lengerich, Westphalia, Germany, pp. 182-196. ISBN 978-3-89967-626-6. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://www.cs.kent.ac.uk/pubs/2010/2994

Abstract

Mirror effects --- simultaneous increases in recognition accuracy for old and new items in a given condition --- provide an important benchmark for memory models, but only if they arise from memory-related differences between conditions. We present a novel approach to distinguish between decision-related (type I) and memory-related (type II) mirror effects in simple yes/no recognition paradigms using event-related potentials (ERPs). We modified a directed forgetting procedure (item-method) to specify and test a relationship between encoding differences (as measured by study phase ERPs), mirror effects (as measured by behavioural data) and ERP retrieval set effects (as measured by test phase ERPs) from the perspective of a strength-based signal detection model of recognition memory. New words were once blocked with old words cued to-be-forgotten (forget retrieval context) and once with old words cued to-be-remembered (remember retrieval context), which produced a mirror effect. In the forget retrieval context, recognition accuracy decreased and ERPs for correctly identified new words were less negative-going in the $\overline{\mbox{N400}}$ time-window (300--500~ms). This ERP retrieval set effect was unrelated to response-criterion shifts between conditions and may instead reflect changes in retrieval orientation, implying a type II mirror effect. Our results suggest that combining behavioural and ERP data can arbitrate between different theoretical explanations of mirror effects and thus memory models.

Item Type: Book section
Additional information: This is the German equivalent of the annual Experimental Psychology Society EPS meeting in the UK.
Uncontrolled keywords: determinacy analysis, Craig interpolants
Subjects: Q Science > QA Mathematics (inc Computing science) > QA 76 Software, computer programming,
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Computing > Computational Intelligence Group
Depositing User: Kristina Dietz
Date Deposited: 21 Sep 2012 09:49 UTC
Last Modified: 09 Feb 2020 04:04 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/30679 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Bowman, Howard: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4736-1869
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